Why bother with advocacy?

When considering advocacy on a new issue, it can be important to understand why advocacy is relevant and important to the issue, and how it can help bring change for people living in poverty who are affected by the issue.

Why should churches be involved in advocacy?

These pages explore the biblical and practical reasons why churches should be involved in advocacy, while acknowledging that there can also be challenges.

Tearfund has produced a series of short booklets, based on many years’ experience in advocacy, about the following issues:

Why advocate on waste and a circular economy (PDF 1.7 MB)

Our current approach to resources is creating mountains of waste, which is killing people and the planet. This booklet sets out why advocacy on waste is so important, and provides ways of helping individuals and organisations do it at a national or local level, through the church and local communities.

Why advocate on climate change? (PDF 344 KB)

This booklet looks at why organisations need to use different advocacy tactics to help tackle the problem of climate change at the local, national or international level.

Why advocate for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR)? (PDF 171 KB)

This booklet sets out why advocacy on DRR is important for holding governments accountable in addressing DRR. It is aimed at organisations that are already involved in DRR, but have not yet considered an advocacy approach to DRR.

Why advocate on governance and corruption? (PDF 804 KB)

This booklet highlights why it is important to undertake advocacy to combat corruption and promote good governance.

Why advocate on HIV? (PDF 257 KB)

This booklet sets out why advocacy on HIV is important and why civil society needs to hold governments accountable for their commitments to tackle HIV. It is aimed at organisations that are already working on HIV, but have not yet considered an advocacy approach to HIV.

Why advocate for Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)? (PDF 178 KB)

This booklet shows why WASH is a crucial issue for governments and a vital political priority, and how an advocacy approach to WASH can complement a programmatic approach to WASH.